Please Donate

Community House of Moorestown is an independent 501(c)3 non-profit that proudly serves the civic, social and recreational needs of Moorestown without any financial assistance from local, state or federal government.

Donations are tax deductible and help us carry out our mission to provide a home for organizations that strengthen our community.

Please make your contribution today.

Our Story

The Community House is a unique and special place that has been serving Moorestown and its surrounding communities since 1926, our mission is to strengthen our community by providing a gathering place for individuals, families and organizations. Today, as in years past, the Community House is home to scores of local clubs and nonprofits. Behind its stately façade are a ballroom, meeting rooms, office space for nonprofit organizations, and our newest event space the Library. We hope to see you soon at the House!

The Community House of Moorestown is proud to be a welcoming organization and facility accessible and utilized by all in our community. We continue to denounce racism and all forms of discrimination and continue to seek involvement from all members of our diverse community.

Our History

In October 1923, an “unknown donor” offered what eventually became $250,000 to build a community center in Moorestown. The unknown donor was Eldridge Reeves Johnson, the founder and leader of the Victor Talking Machine Company.

According to Johnson, he became interested in the product that would make his fortune when a broken-down talking machine was brought into his shop for repair. Johnson said that at that point he saw a great business opportunity and became so excited he broke out with “talking machine fever.”

His home on Moorestown’s Main Street was called “The Towers,” and was originally the home of Samuel Allen (inventor of the Flexible Flyer sled); it is now the Lutheran Home.

In 1923, while living in “The Towers,” Johnson was approached by Mabel d’Olier of the Moorestown Woman’s Club. She was looking for land and financing to build a community center. Mr. Johnson agreed to donate the funds necessary to build the facility, if the people in town would show their interest by creating a “permanent maintenance fund” for building operations. Within eight months, more than $106,000 was raised in a town-wide fund drive. Donations came from 740 individuals, 500 school children, and dozens of local civic and fraternal organizations.

The cost of maintaining the structure was a key consideration in the architectural style of the Community House. The building was actually a combination of English and Colonial style, with the chief advantage of the design being that the building’s maintenance and upkeep would, “cost practically nothing because of its brick and stone exterior. If, on the other hand, it was Colonial in style, the windows, shutters, cornices and columns would have to be made out of wood. And wood rots and constantly has to be replaced.”

The site for the new Community House would be in the center of town on a three-acre property on East Main Street owned by Mary Sumner. The existing house on the property was one of the oldest in Moorestown, dating back to about 1786. It was originally a summer residence for a Philadelphia businessman and his family. Along with a barn and a pig pen, the grounds featured a formal English garden with flowering shrubs and low-cut boxwood bushes.

In December 1924, the Sumner Home was demolished, and construction of the Community House began. The Community House officially opened its doors to the public on April 11, 1926, with a week-long series of events including Community Players Night with selections by the Moorestown Orchestra, a Teenage Tea for the girls of Moorestown, a concert by the Moorestown Community Chorus, and an exhibition match by the University of Pennsylvania Wrestling Team.

In 1931, the Community House was enlarged to provide additional meeting space. The first-floor area was remodeled in 1993 to allow disabled individuals access to the meeting rooms. In 2008, the gymnasium was converted into an elegant ballroom. The Garden Room was extensively refurbished in 2011 and the main lobby area was remodeled in 2013. After the building sustained a tragic fire in 2015, it was necessary to restore the Club Room, Lobby and upstairs area, which now includes a beautiful bridal suite. In 2017, “The Library” space, home to the original Moorestown Library, was lovingly brought back to its original splendor and is available to rent for meetings and events.

The cost of maintaining the structure was a key consideration in the architectural style of the Community House. The building was actually a combination of English and Colonial style, with the chief advantage of the design being that the building’s maintenance and upkeep would, “cost practically nothing because of its brick and stone exterior. If, on the other hand, it was Colonial in style, the windows, shutters, cornices and columns would have to be made out of wood. And wood rots and constantly has to be replaced.”

FAQs

Why is the Community House unique?

No other town or community in NJ has an independent community center such as ours.

Who owns and operates the Community House?

The Community House of Moorestown is an independent 501(c)(3) non-profit organization with tax-exempt status. Operations are overseen by a Board of Trustees and governed by a Charter and a set of bylaws. Daily operations are overseen by the Executive Director.

Does the Community House receive any funding from the local government?

No. The Community House does not receive any Township, County, State or Federal funding. It relies exclusively on donations from the community and room rental fees.

How big is the Community House?

The building is 25,000 square feet. It has 3 floors, 40 rooms, 7 bathrooms, and an elevator. The grounds are 2.2 acres.

How expensive is it to operate the Community House?

Our annual operating budget is $650,000-$700,000. As can be expected, it is very expensive to maintain the large, old building and constantly be “event ready.” But through the support of the community, we have been able to operate for nearly 100 years and hopefully at least 100 more!

Scroll to Top